Hands-on Science that Makes Sense: Supercharged Science

 

We enjoy science in our homeschool, but I’m not always confident about the best way to teach it and make it really relevant and approachable to my kids.  If you’ve ever felt challenged teaching science, or if your kids really love science, you’ll want to read today’s post.   Plus, you’ll have access to 5 free really cool complete science lessons, including “self-teaching” how-to videos.  (If you can’t wait, CLICK HERE to get them now!)

Supercharged Science 5 free lessons for The Homeschool Post readers @hsbapost @destinyblogger

{This is a sponsored post written on behalf of Supercharged Science.}

When it comes to teaching science, so many parents ask as single question:
“WHAT DO MY KIDS REALLY NEED TO KNOW ABOUT SCIENCE?”

Maybe you can relate.

I mean the curriculum publishers list out the chapters in their program, the state says something different based on standards, and friends tell us yet another story.
This is actually a really common question. Finally, today, I’ve got an answer – but it’s a bit different than you might think.

You see, it’s not the right question to ask first. It’s like stopping at a gas station to ask for directions and simply saying “How do I get there?”

First, you need to know where you want to go. Then someone can give you directions.
Different people have different goals in having their kids learn science! I’ll tell you some of the most common ones and explain how to get there. Then you can decide which is right for you and your kids.

Here are the top reasons people want their kids to learn science:
1.     To gain a true appreciation for the wondrous world we live in
2.     To learn to think in a logical & methodical way
3.     To learn to appreciate and enjoy a topic that they can really use in their future (like for a career)
4.     To be prepared for college entry requirements
5.     To meet state science requirements

Which ones are your top goals for your kids?

The good news is that reaching a number of these goals at the same time is pretty do-able.

If you picked any of the first three as your top choice, then you probably want to focus on hands-on science with academic material to support what kids learn through doing experiments (the rest of the reasons might be important to you, but I’m talking about your FIRST choice here.)

Your kids’ time should be focused on things like building robots, launching rockets, creating laser-beam splitters and stuff like that first.  Then, after teaching each topic, by providing the academics to support it, and also giving your kids flexibility to continue learning extra in areas that they’re really excited about.

Of course this first approach usually prepares kids well for college too and can be tailored to meet state requirements.

If reasons 4 or 5 were your top choices, then you may want a more “traditional” textbook based approach. State standards and entry requirements are usually based on a public school education, so they test for what that kind of education usually provides. This is typically memorization rather than true understanding. Kids tend to have less fun with this approach, but you can pack more academic material into a shorter time period. Note that kids who learn this way are much less likely to become inspired or excited by science.

I recently learned all this from Aurora Lipper, who is a master science teacher at Supercharged Science (not to mention a real live rocket scientist who used to work for NASA, but is now a mom who devotes her time to sharing her love of science with kids). She has created an award winning science curriculum that teaches science this way.

Click here to try a free sample of it, or to get details on the complete curriculum.

It turns out that when kids do hand-on science, they get much more excited to learn it and therefore teaching it is much easier (not a big surprise, right).
By doing this, kids gain a true appreciation for the world around them, AND they learn the academics.  They also remember the academic material much longer than kids who just learned from a book (and know it on a level they can really use).
If you want to see this with your own kids, today I’ve got a collection of science lessons for you that are actually “self-teaching”.  They feature step-by-step teaching videos that your kids can go through on their own, plus a supporting workbook.

And they’re entirely FREE for The Homeschool Post readers!

Click here to download it now.

The idea is that if kids learn about hydraulics by building a working hydraulic robot.  Then, they think it’s so cool, they really want to learn the academic side of things, because then they can build even more cool stuff.
The point is, it makes them WANT to learn.

I can’t imagine too many kids reading a chapter in a textbook where they had to do a bunch of equations on hydraulic pressure and then say “Wow, that was so much fun, can I do some more equations?!”

I believe that kids really need to try things in the real world in order to genuinely understand and appreciate it!

Remember when you first learned to drive. You may have known what the steering wheel, gas pedal and brake did on an intellectual level. But, going out in traffic armed with just this knowledge would have been a pretty dangerous thing. You needed hands-on experience to really know how to drive.

The same thing is true with science. The books might have all the facts, but to really know science, you need to do LOTS of hands-on experiments and projects.

Here’s the BOTTOM LINE:
If you want your kids to have a true appreciation for the world around them AND be prepared for college and life, get a science curriculum that focuses on hands-on science activities first, and then introduces the academics to support them (not the other way around).

Regardless of what science curriculum you choose, PLEASE ask questions before you invest in any science curriculum or program you’re considering.  I know you want to do the best you possibly can for your kids.

To get the free “self-teaching” science lessons and the risk-free science curriculum trial CLICK HERE.

 

Sara (17 Posts)

I'm a reader, writer, dreamer, wife, and homeschooling mom of 3 girls. We take a relaxed, eclectic, Charlotte Mason-leaning, Montessori-ish, literature-rich, delight-directed, almost unschooling-at-times approach to learning. Lots of unit studies, field trips, and lapbooks, too. I like to blog about our learning adventures (plus faith and encouragement) at Embracing Destiny.


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Resource Roundup: St. Patrick’s Day

 

 

#Homeschool Resource Roundup for St. Patrick's Day

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!  Are you looking for some last minute ideas to use in your homeschool today and throughout the week?  From rainbow science to crafts, unit studies, and the real story of St. Patrick, you’re sure to find something here that will be fun and educational for your kiddos.  My thanks to the great homeschool bloggers who are kind enough to share these projects with us.

St. Patrick’s Day FREE printables from In All You Do.  There are math worksheets, coloring pages, writing prompts, copywork, and more here.  A real treasure trove of St. Patrick’s Day printables!

St. Patrick’s Day Quick and Easy M&M Pretzel Treats from Greatly Blessed.

Bible Science Experiment: Rainbow in a Glass from Christianity Cove.

Free & Frugal St. Patrick’s Day Homeschool Resources from Embracing Destiny.

Free St. Patrick’s Day Notebooking Pages from Cynce’s Place.

St Patrick's Day Notebooking Pages

There are some fun rainbow craft ideas at Educating Laytons, as well as a free printable St. Patrick’s Day scavenger hunt.

Head over to Kathy’s Cluttered Mind for St. Patrick’s Day resources and cool rainbow crafts like these:

St. Patrick's Day Rainbow Crafts

Here are some books to help you in your studies of Ireland and St. Patrick:

 

Do you have any St. Patrick’s Day traditions or fun activities to share?

 

 

Sara (17 Posts)

I'm a reader, writer, dreamer, wife, and homeschooling mom of 3 girls. We take a relaxed, eclectic, Charlotte Mason-leaning, Montessori-ish, literature-rich, delight-directed, almost unschooling-at-times approach to learning. Lots of unit studies, field trips, and lapbooks, too. I like to blog about our learning adventures (plus faith and encouragement) at Embracing Destiny.


A Word From Our Sponsors

The 2014 Confident Mom Weekly Household Planner
***Bring Master Art Teacher TOS/HEF columnist Pat Knepley into your home! Year’s curriculum. Step-by-step lessons. Biblical integration. www.seethelightshine.com***

What is So Great about a Homeschool Convention?

Homeschool Convention is Great for Continuing Education

A Homeschool Convention is a great place to feel encouraged, connected and re-energized for your role as a homeschooling parent. Whether you are new to homeschooling or a seasoned homeschooler, there is always more to see and more to learn.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links.

 Homeschool Conventions

Children are not static beings, they grow, learn and change levels throughout their educational life. Unlike public school teachers who are trained to teach one age level,a homeschooling parent will need to learn, grow and adapt to meet the ever changing needs of their children.

There is no better place to do this than at a homeschool convention.  Think of it as your continuing education resource. {Tweet This}  Most offer more than just a sales floor to buy curriculum. Many offer a wide variety of seminars and conferences. It is at these conferences that you can learn and explore a wide variety of educational topics.

Possible Topics at a Convention

  • Homeschool Methods
  • Learning Styles
  • Special Needs
  • Organization
  • Marriage and Family Encouragement
  • Humor in Homeschool
  • Gifted Learning
  • Legalities & How To’s
  • Homeschooling with Preschoolers
  • Homeschooling through each level, elementary, middle, junior and high school.
  • Notebooking, Lapbooking and Unit Studies

Going to a convention can be extremely rewarding or extremely overwhelming. That is determined by what you expect to get out of it. If you go with the thought that the convention is the place where you will have all of your homeschooling questions answered, then you will most likely walk away disappointed. If you go with the mindset that you will have a chance to physically window shop for curriculum, ask specific questions about the curriculum, listen to speakers discuss curriculum and be encouraged by other homeschooling families and speakers you will walk away feeling encouraged and uplifted.

Great for Encouragement

There are other great things about a homeschool convention, but for me, the greatest thing is connecting with other homeschooling families. {Tweet This} Whether you meet a mom waiting in the hallway or in a seminar, you find yourself exchanging emails and/or facebooks and before you know it those connections become a thread in your woven homeschool community.

This year I’m excited to be going to Great Homeschool Convention for the 4th year. I’m looking forward to their wide variety of vendors, the 100′s of individual seminars and of course, at the Cincinnati location, the aroma of cinnamon wafting through the air. If you see me there, stop and say “Hi, Renée.”

GHC Registration

Renée (12 Posts)

Renée Brown is author at her personal blog, Great Peace Academy. She is a homeschooling mom to her one amazing son, Jonathan and has been the wife of her Beloved Michael for 21 years. On her blog you will find discussions about her work as a homeschooling mom, her family and her faith.


A Word From Our Sponsors

The 2014 Confident Mom Weekly Household Planner
***Bring Master Art Teacher TOS/HEF columnist Pat Knepley into your home! Year’s curriculum. Step-by-step lessons. Biblical integration. www.seethelightshine.com***