When Your Children Just Need You

 

She creeps into the living room and curls up next to me on the couch. I hug her gently, then cover her with a blanket and absentmindedly rub her back for a few seconds before I resume typing. She lays quietly, one of the only times of the day she’s still.

Most mornings I’m able to stay focused and productive.

Not today.

Today my mind wanders. I think about the little person next to me. Is she taller than yesterday? I hadn’t realized that her toes poke out from under this blanket. I readjust her cover, trying to get her entire body to fit underneath.

When your children just need you.

I want to finish one more thing before I close my laptop. But I know that too often, one more thing turns into ten more things, and she’s up and running around, asking for breakfast, and her sister needs something too, and I’m frustrated, trying to finish my work, but no longer even making sense with my words.

I wonder why I do that to myself. Why do I waste these precious opportunities? I know quiet will come, during after-school quiet time, or after bedtime, and there will be another chance to write.

Too often, I choose to work until a little after my self-set time is up. Today, an exception, I choose the best thing.

I hear the beep as my laptop closes. My daughter looks up, surprised. I set my computer on the coffee table, draw her on to my lap and whisper, “You’re more important. I’m sorry that I don’t always choose the best. I’m choosing the best today. Let’s chat.”

She looks into my eye and softly kisses my cheeks before leaning into me with a deep, satisfied sigh.

I hug her gently, content in knowing that I chose the best. My words to the world can wait. But my babies? They won’t keep.

 

Davonne (11 Posts)

Davonne Parks is a married Christian homeschool mom who began teaching her children at home in 2009. She blogs about cultivating a heart for motherhood, as well as organization and simplicity, at DavonneParks.com. Davonne believes that some of life’s richest moments happen when we embrace the beauty of imperfection as we extend grace to ourselves and others. She’s written two eBooks, “101 Time-Saving Tips for Busy Moms” (free to her blog subscribers) and “28 Days to Timeliness: Tips and Confessions from a Semi-Reformed Late Person.”


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Homeschooling with Faith: Reading the Christian Classics

When I began to mature in my Christian walk, I realized that reading the classics of Christian writing was an important part of that process. I read Pilgrim’s Progress by John Bunyan and Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God by Jonathan Edwards because they were familiar titles that I’d heard of many times. From there I discovered A.W. Tozer, John Wesley, D.L. Moody, and Charles Spurgeon.  C.S. Lewis has become one of my favorite writers for all of his theological writing, not just the Narnia series.

 

Homeschooling with Faith: Reading the Christian Classics www.hsbapost.com @hsbapost

 

There are still so many things I want to read to examine my faith, deepen my knowledge, and enrich my spiritual walk with Jesus. The Bible is the first and best resource, of course, but I believe it’s important to read what these great theologians and devoted Christ-followers have said to edify believers.

I also believe it’s important to pass these things on to my children.  I was well into my adult life and married before I began to study these writings.  I hope to start my children with an earlier foundation of apologetics and intelligent discourse of the faith so they are more prepared than I was to wrestle with these issues in their lives and defend their beliefs. {Tweet This}

 

Have you read the Christian classics?  Have you studied them with your children?

 

 

Part of the 75+ ebooks and resources offered in the Christian Living Bundle include these great Christian classics by some of the names I mentioned above.  If you haven’t seen this bundle yet, you’ll want to check it out before midnight Nov. 10th when it expires.  There are devotionals, parenting, marriage, financial, and kids’ books included, all for one low price of $34.95.

 

 

 

Sara (37 Posts)

I'm a reader, writer, dreamer, wife, and homeschooling mom of 3 girls. We take a relaxed, eclectic, Charlotte Mason-leaning, Montessori-ish, literature-rich, delight-directed, almost unschooling-at-times approach to learning. Lots of unit studies, field trips, and lapbooks, too. I like to blog about our learning adventures (plus faith and encouragement) at Embracing Destiny.


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***Early Christmas special for HOMESCHOOL POST readers: 25% off BIBLE STORIES 5 DVD Boxed set + FREE SHIPPING. Over 17 hours of content including 15 stories and 15 complete step-by-step art lessons. Code to use: HSP http://www.seethelightshine.com/store/bible-stories.html***
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When Your Kid Hates Your New Curriculum

 

When Your Kid Hates Your New Curriculum

My head might explode right now.

$400 and she hates it.

I’m having to resist the urge to tell her that the problem is that she is being lazy.

I wouldn’t dare say that out loud. She’s my baby girl. Not the youngest, but still my baby. Even in the 5th grade.

The curriculum is not hard, or over her head. It just requires effort. A different kind of effort than she is used to putting forth, yes, but not something she isn’t capable of doing.

We’re both in tears and now she thinks I’m mad at her.

I’m not. I tell her I’m not. I tell her to go take a break so Momma can think.

There has to be a way to make this work.

**********

Does this sound familiar to you? Have you ever found yourself two weeks into the school year with a curriculum that just isn’t working for your child?

I don’t have all the answers, but I can share with you what I plan to do for my daughter.

Finding Middle Ground

Step One: Listen – Take a deep breath and try to really hear what she is saying. Ask questions about what she doesn’t like, or what she is having trouble with and try (this is the hard part for me) to listen to her answers objectively.

Step Two: Consider what worked last year – I know, if it worked last year I wouldn’t have switched things up right? I’m wondering if the things I changed were the wrong things. Maybe I was wrong in my assumptions about exactly what didn’t work last year, and tried “fixing” the things that were working.

Step Three: Consider what really didn’t work last year – Here is where I need to think about what she said she didn’t like last year, and be open to the possibility that her maturity level has moved up, and what didn’t work then might work now. I also need to get to the bottom of why it didn’t work. Too much reading? Trouble with comprehension? Not enough hands on time? Did my new choice in curriculum eliminate those obstacles? Is it even an obstacle that needs eliminating, or is it something she really needs to just work through?

Step Four: Meet in the Middle – I listened, and what I heard was she wanted me to teach her like I did last year. Last year was more one on one, sitting on the couch, less computerized. Our new curriculum is completely on the computer. I considered last year, what worked and what didn’t and realized, with a heavy heart, that my decision to switch was mostly based on her older sister’s needs, not hers. Dad wanted more grades (or at least a more obvious method of determining retention of material), because their annual evaluations haven’t gone well. The new curriculum fixed that as it records their progress and assignments making it easier for me to show him how we are progressing. But my girl wants more one on one learning and less computer. So, I’m negotiating for a bit.

I printed out her lesson text and the chapter reviews. Tomorrow, we will sit on our couch, and read the lesson together. She can do the review questions with pen and paper, the way she is accustomed to doing them, and then she can key her answers into the software. If after two more weeks, she still just doesn’t like it, I’ll break out our other books (I’m not the only one that hoards homeschooling stuff, am I?) and let her go back to the way it used to be.

It’s a kick in the tail to have to stop, two weeks in, and accept that you may have made the wrong decision. This, however, is one of the blessings I find in homeschooling. I can change. I can adjust her lessons. I can adapt the style to better fit my baby girl. While I do not enjoy wasting money, I have two others that will eventually enter the fifth grade, so if we end up dropping the curriculum it won’t be a total loss.

Do you ever find yourself having to change it up before it even gets going? What did you do to adapt?

What was the biggest learning obstacle for your children?

 

Lisa Baldwin (61 Posts)

Disciple of Christ, Wife, Mother of Four, Homeschooler, Crafter, Designer (Graphics and CSS/HTML), Blogger. I share too much, laugh at the wrong things, and fall on my backside regularly. Thank goodness Jesus ignores all of that and loves me anyway.


A Word From Our Sponsors

Homeschool Products from Nest Learning
***Early Christmas special for HOMESCHOOL POST readers: 25% off BIBLE STORIES 5 DVD Boxed set + FREE SHIPPING. Over 17 hours of content including 15 stories and 15 complete step-by-step art lessons. Code to use: HSP http://www.seethelightshine.com/store/bible-stories.html***
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