Encouragement for Homeschool Moms Giveaway Bundle!

 

Could you use a little encouragement in your daily duties as a homeschool mom? I know I could. We don’t do what we do for awards or acknowledgement, but we need a chance to refuel our own spirits in order to keep on giving to our families.

A Journey through Learning wants to encourage homeschool moms so they’re hosting this giveaway to do just that. Not only are they our favorite source for lapbooks, they were founded by two homeschool moms who understand what it’s like to be in the trenches of teaching and mothering every day.

Encouragement 4 Mom Giveway

 

*affiliate links may be used

We are firm believers that the best way for a homeschool mom to stay on track – is for a homeschool mom to stay close to Jesus. A daily walk with the Lord can make all the difference in the tone of your home and homeschool.

On that note . . . this giveaway is all about encouraging and lifting up the homeschool mom and supporting a close walk with the Savior.

Giveaway items in this lovely package include:

The ESV Journaling Bible – (Value $38)

 


The ESV Journaling Bible provides the perfect way for you to keep a journal of your spiritual life right inside the Bible that you read and study each day. With covers and formats that look like the finest journals, the Journaling Bible features two-inch ruled margins for writing observations, reflections, prayers, praises, notes, and journal entries.

  • Black letter text
  • Double-column
  • Paragraph format
  • Cream-colored paper
  • 2″ ruled margins
  • One-Year Bible Reading Plan
  • Introductions and section headings for each Bible book

Staedtler Triplus Fineliner Pens 10 color Pack (value $15)

You’ll need some pretty pens to go along with your new Journible . . . so we thought this lovely set would be a nice addition.

 

 

HEART of Worship – CD

Praise Music to open your heart for time with the Lord (value $8)

Bible Study – WORD

Get to know God through His Word and fall in love with Him again … or for the first time. Lyn Smith has put together this brand new- life changing – heart filling study of God’s living Word. (value $12) WORD - Ps 119

Tea/coffee Mug – (value $11)

Joyful Blessings bone china mug with a sky blue background and a decal design and message – Zephaniah 3:17

 

Harney & SonsTea Sachet collection in tin (value $9)

20 tea sachets in decorative tin – Chamomile Herbal tea

Prayer for New Brides: Putting on God’s Armor After the Wedding Dress

This book encourages women newly married or otherwise to:

– Learn biblical truths about marriage, the spiritual battle, and prayer
– Pray in agreement with God’s will for her marriage
– Activate these truths in her life through study, journaling, and intentional conversations with her husband and other wives.

eBook ($9.99 value)

This giveaway is especially for a homeschool Mom – but we want to be sure to treat her with new curriculum for the kids too!

1. Enjoy the Spring Lapbook with Study Guide (download)- stand alone study with everything all about spring! What is Spring? How Do We Know When Spring Has Arrived?, Spring Holidays, Spring Babies, Spring Equinox & more

2. Wildlife Adventures Unit Study: Bald Eagles- with bible, spelling, vocabulary, science, history, geography & more! (Icons of Washington DC – included in the fun unit study)

AJTL Giveaway - Spring Lapbook Bald Eagles Unit Study

 

FREEBIES:

Grateful Journal – by Ben & Me: log the things you are grateful for daily, month by month

Praying the Scriptures for Your Family – by Candace Crabtree: learn how to pray the Word for your family

Sand Dollar Writing Prompts & Writing Practice for all Ages – by Kelli Becton

 

Giveaway

1 Winner – Giveaway ends March 5 at 12 a.m. – Must be U.S. Residents to enter – by entering, you give consent to be contacted via email by AJTL and other contributing companies.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

Spring Specials

Don’t miss the 50% off Spring Sale from A Journey through Learning, too!

Sara (58 Posts)

I'm a reader, writer, dreamer, wife, and homeschooling mom of 3 girls. We take a relaxed, eclectic, Charlotte Mason-leaning, Montessori-ish, literature-rich, delight-directed, almost unschooling-at-times approach to learning. Lots of unit studies, field trips, and lapbooks, too. I like to blog about our learning adventures (plus faith and encouragement) at Embracing Destiny.


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What’s A Mother To Do?

 

Mothers need Encouragement & Continued Growth: Why It Matters that Homeschool Moms Take Time for Themselves @hsbapost

It is written somewhere, “A mother is only a woman, but she needs the love of Jacob, the patience of Job, the wisdom of Moses, the foresight of Joseph, and the firmness of Daniel.” But a mother has not only to have all these things; she must have them all at once, often when she is quite young, and too often when she has had no previous training of any kind of the marvellously varied duties she has to perform. ~Parents’ Review, Mother Culture

I’m not there now but I was: The baby cries- maybe she’s teething, or maybe he is sick; the toddler wants food now; the dishes -wait, didn’t you just do those?- are piling up on the counters; school has to be done at least one day in the week; the laundry has become Mt. Laundris; and at some point dinner plans have to be at least thought about. Then Mr. Wonderful comes home and asks you how your day has been.

Or when the kids are older it looks more like this: Older sister has to get to her job by 10 am; Baby brother has sports practice at 10 am; Hubby needs his dry cleaning picked up and prescriptions filled today; and grocery shopping- did the list even get made?- is a must or it’s pizza delivery again. And Mt. Laundris is still there, but piles up even faster because the clothes are bigger!

Before she marries, she pictures to herself little of the extreme difficulties of managing that most complicated of machines, a household — not for one week only, during her mother’s absence, but for year after year, without stop or stay, for the rest of her time……The center of it all is one little woman — wife, mother, mistress all in one! Then it is that she gets overdone. Then it is that she wears herself out. Then it is that, in her efforts to be ideal wife, mother, and mistress, she forgets that she is herself. Then it is, in fact, that she stops growing. ~Parents’ Review, Mother Culture

The theme this month at The Homeschool Post is balancing marriage, parenting, and homeschooling. In this post, I’d like to carve out of that the bit about a Mother. For the most part, in a traditional setting, none of those three things exist without the mother. While a ragged mother is still a mother, that’s not the kind she wishes to be, to be sure! And a ragged mother will not bring balance to a home.

Mothers need rest and refreshment. What that looks like will be different for each mother. Physical rest is nice, yes; but I mean rest from the everyday, from the mundane. (Mundane in this instance means of this earthly world, not necessarily boring!) Refreshment is also different for different mothers. Some need companionship to be refreshed; others crave quiet and solitude to recharge.

For the weary mother who just wants some help getting things together, get it under control, there are quite a few posts here that touch on this: Encouragement (love the first post on 5 gifts for under $5 for Mom and Filled with Gratitude!).

How about the mothers that feel they are ‘just a mother’?

Is there not some need for “mother culture”? But how is the state of things to be altered? So many mothers say, “I simply have no time for myself!” “I never read a book!” Or else, “I don’t think it is right to think of myself!” They not only starve their minds, but they do it deliberately, and with a sense of self-sacrifice which seems to supply ample justification. ~Parents’ Review, Mother Culture

What’s to be done? 

The only way to do it is to be so strongly impressed with the necessity for growing herself that she herself makes it a real object in life. She can only rarely be helped from the outside. The resolute planting of Miss Three-years-old in her chair at one end of the table with her toys, of Master Five-years-old at the other with his occupations, and fascinating Master Baby on the rug on the floor with his ring and his ball–the decided announcement, “Now mother is going to be busy”–will do those young people a world of good! Though some of their charms will be missed, they will gain respect from mother’s time, and some self-reliance into the bargain, while mother’s tired back gets a rest, if only for a short time, either on the sofa or flat upon the floor. ~Parents’ Review, Mother Culture

Learn something that you want to learn! Learn to crochet, or knit. Read a title that you’ve often heard about but could never take the time to read. Learn a second language. Begin keeping notebooks of observations of the world around. Watch a documentary about a place you’ve wanted to travel.

That is the secret; always have something “going” to grow by. If we mothers were all “growing” there would be less going astray among our boys, less separation in mind from our girls. ~Parents’ Review, Mother Culture

Some places around the web that can help you see why it is so important and possibly find things that you would like to do to help continue growing:

Strong Haven: A Mother’s Feast Link-Up

Afterthoughts: It’s Not Selfish

Simply Convivial: What Is Schole?

North Laurel (19 Posts)

Blossom- "North Laurel" to the online world- lives in Ohio with her husband and two teens, homeschooling the Charlotte Mason way with Ambleside Online. She is graciously allowed to be a moderator for the Ambleside Online Forum. North Laurel loves to read, be on the computer, and learn. You can read her blogging about homeschooling, book reviews and life in general at North Laurel Home & School.


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Division of Labor, Multiplication of Love

 

There are many non-obvious benefits to homeschooling.

In this post I want to talk about the fact that, done properly, homeschooling will actually strengthen marriages.

Homeschooling Can Strengthen Marriage ~ A Homeschool Dad's Perspective @hsbapost

Nothing pains me more than to see homeschoolers make classic mistakes. It can be so hard just to muster the courage to remove one’s children from *the system* in the first place….that I hate to see failure on much easier decisions and actions.

Just off the top of my head I would say that some of the classic mistakes include: recreating “school at home”, trying to purchase educational results, submitting to Minecraft, television, and cell phone mania, adopting the ridiculously low standards of government schools, trying to constantly make learning “fun”….and one more – having one parent do ALL OF THE HOMESCHOOLING.

Recently I was on a “homeschool dad” forum and one after another admitted that their wives do “99% of the homeschooling”. Some declared themselves the “principal” of their family’s homeschool, whatever that means. My gut reaction to reading all this, for the umpteenth time, was pretty negative. Although my wife’s was far more indignant! Her stance on the matter is very chauvinistic, “Hah….typical do-nothing men who think being in charge is work.”

You see, she’s employed by a large financial institution which is run by, well, the people she just described! And despite her lofty and vast responsibilities there, she still manages to play a very active role in the home education of our children. She does at least 50% of it despite 6 am commuter trains to catch and flying to so many countries that border control has trouble finding room for a new stamp on her passport!

There’s just NO EXCUSE for a homeschooling parent to, well, do nothing.

The off-parent can research materials and ideas on the web, can assign books to the kids, can go over their work each day even if for only 10 minutes.

The off-parent can help plan out each week’s assignments. They can do math. They can have important discussions with their kids. They can reinforce, rather than undermine(!), the daily rules and discipline of the household. They can email their kids interesting articles. My children, still only 8 and 10 years old, are emailing their mother all day long about their assignments and whatnot. All of this falls certainly under the heading of “homeschooling”.

Sure, exercise is important but the father who thinks his job is merely to throw a ball to his kids or explain televised football penalties, well, they aren’t doing anything more than a “school father”.

Sometimes it’s not totally the off-parent’s fault either. Sometimes they aren’t involved because the on-parent is territorial and all but discourages input or help. Think of the young mother who never lets or demands that Dad change a diaper….who then can never go away for a couple days because the baby (or Dad!) wouldn’t survive on Dad’s watch.

I’m old fashioned in many respects but am decidedly new-fashioned when it comes to the division of labor within a marriage. I feel strongly that both remunerative work and housework should be shared as much as possible. And the same goes for the homeschooling work!

After all, we are trying to raise polymaths, right? What kind of example is set for a son when Dad never does housework? How can a daughter ever learn to value math when her own mother avoids it like the plague?

It’s really incumbent on the parent who’s being squeezed out to insert and assert themselves more.

And it’s incumbent on the single homeschooling parent to demand more cooperation from their spouse.

Why?

What’s so wrong with having roles? What’s wrong with playing to our strengths as parents?

Nothing super horrible anyway. Except that such a working chemistry wastes a huge opportunity and can even introduce risks to a family.

There was a widely-read article in the Wall Street Journal recently that recommended couples marry while they are young, immature, and still struggling rather than when they were older and established in life. An early marriage was likened to a “start-up” – teeming with energy and potential and a later marriage was likened to a stodgy combination of intractable corporate behemoths.

Here’s the link again – Advice for a Happy Life by Charles Murray – take a moment to read it now. It’s short and worthy of your attention.

I couldn’t help but read that about “start-up marriages” without realizing that the very act of homeschooling is essentially a start-up.

A young family is a blank slate, a pile of clay,…it can be designed, dreamed, and sculpted into anything. Of course I’m talking about the kids, but also about Mom and Dad. Homeschooling presents a unique opportunity for a family to learn, work and grow together.

I realized that my wife and I, while having vastly different friends and hobbies, we at least have our kids in common. In addition to what we do directly with them, we’ve spent many, many nights up in bed talking about our children. We’re planning, hoping, commiserating, worrying, and strategizing any number of things: from hiring teachers, altering curricula, shifting foci of attention, how to better discipline them, etc. It can be so intense that many, many times one of us has declared, “Okay, no more talking about the kids tonight.”

Yeah of course we’ve had some legendary arguments: Spanish or French, punishments, how much academic work is enough, etc. and decision “spheres” certainly do take shape.

HOWEVER, most parents don’t have this; they don’t have this fodder to constantly talk about; as a couple, they don’t have common goals (i.e. children) they are working on, together. Sure school parents may also spend a lot of time discussing their kids….EXCEPT they are powerless to really do anything about how their kids are being raised, educated, and not to mention socialized!

The thing with marital relationships is, they either move forward and get better…..or they tragically deteriorate.

And as I said at the top, in the middle, and just above….done properly, homeschooling will strengthen your marriage – it definitely has in my case.

Lastly, I’ll explain the title of the post.

Mathematically speaking, when “labor” is “divided by 1″….it’s not effectively a division. In that case it’s more accurately a separation of labor and effectively a separation of people.

 

Dan (9 Posts)

Husband to Inez. Father of John and Christine. Homeschool Coach, Accelerated Math Teacher. Former derivatives trader and future scratch golfer! Follow our learning adventures at HomeschoolDad.com.


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