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Tips for Purging Your Homeschool Curriculum at the End of the Year

 

As the end of the traditional school year winds down it is time to start thinking about clearing out curriculum that you no longer need. It feels good to purge out old material and look forward to fresh new topics for the upcoming school year. But how do you purge out the old? Is there a method to your madness?  I am sure that there are many methods, but today I’m sharing with you how I purge out my old curriculum here and hope you find it useful in your own homeschool.

Tips for purging your homeschool curriculum at the end of the year. hsbapost.com

Purging Your Homeschool Curriculum

Go through it all

I take everything off shelves, out of bins, and in the closet. Then I begin to put it back one at a time, keeping only things that are still in good condition, can be reused the next year, and that we love. Everything else goes in the toss, sell, donate piles. Books, manipulatives, games, posters, everything gets a once over and finds itself either packed up to go or back on our shelves.

Here are some questions you might ask yourself while going through your curriculum to help you decide what to keep or toss:

  • Do you need to keep until your evaluation is over?
  • Can a younger sibling use it?
  • Does your child still need review in that area?
  • Is it in usable condition?
  • Have we used this item at all this year?
  • If I need it short term can I just get it from the library?

Decide how long to keep things

Are you holding on to them for a younger sibling? How long are you willing to hold on to them? My personal rule of thumb for 90% of curriculum and supplies is that if the next child will not use it within the next two years it goes. That may change as they children get older and this may vary for your situation. Things like math and grammar do not change so they have a longer shelf life than other items. If you want to keep items for future use but will not use them in the upcoming school year go ahead and pack them away in a tote to keep your shelves clear.

Choose where to sell items

There are many ways to rid yourself of curriculum and other items that you no longer need or want — online curriculum sale groups, Ebay, your Co-op, local curriculum sales, yard sales. Price reasonably and list in more than one location. Try not to bring anything back into the school area once you’ve made a decision to get rid of it. If you have have items that do not sell but you are willing to donate, take them to Goodwill or try something online like homeschoolfree.org or thebooksamaritan.com.

I hope I have inspired you to give your shelves and other homeschool hotspots a good purging!

Do you get rid of curriculum at the end of the year? Are you getting ready to purchase next year’s books? Let us know in the comments!

Sara (142 Posts)

I'm a reader, writer, dreamer, wife, and homeschooling mom of 3 girls. We take a relaxed, eclectic, Charlotte Mason-leaning, Montessori-ish, literature-rich, delight-directed, almost unschooling-at-times approach to learning. Lots of unit studies, field trips, and lapbooks, too. I like to blog about our learning adventures (plus faith and encouragement) at Embracing Destiny.


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5 Reasons Every Homeschool Should Use Sensory Bins

 

Sensory bins have been a huge thing in many classrooms for the last few years, but especially for homeschoolers. However, not everyone uses them if they don’t believe their child has sensory issues. As a homeschooling parent you should definitely be using these in your homeschool regardless of sensory needs of your children. These reasons below are just the beginning of why you should begin using sensory bins for your homeschool classroom.

Are you using sensory bins in your homeschool? Here are 5 great reason why you should! hsbapost.com

5 Reasons Every Homeschool Should Use Sensory Bins

Encourages classification understanding.

Learning about classification applies in multiple parts of education. Sensory bins are excellent for children to understand how to sort, separate, and recognize items. They are a great way to have children sort colors, textures, like items, items that don’t belong, and even shapes. Since classification matters in math and science so much, it is a great tool not just for younger children but also grade school level classroom work.

Helps kids use all of their senses.

The senses are part of exploration, knowledge, and learning. Sensory bins obviously help your kids use all the senses, but this is also a super fun way to encourage them to recognize what senses they are using. Encouraging them to not just experience the sensory bins, but to note what senses they use to separate items and classify them is a great way to help them to really think outside the box. Kids don’t often think about how they are using not just their eyes to see food, but their sense of smell and taste to determine what something is. The same thing goes with their sense of touch and smell when they are working in a sensory bin.

Encourages calming in active children.

Kids that struggle with ADD, ADHD, or simply have a hard time focusing can really benefit from learning through a sensory bin. It gives them something hands on to touch and play with while they learn. You can even easily give your children sensory bins to work with while you are going over lessons, reading or asking them questions about what you have been covering. Utilizing a sensory bin throughout the classroom is great for kids who tend to struggle with staying still and concentrating. You can easily help them focus on the lesson by providing a sensory bin that is applicable.

Helps to incorporate all subjects in one location.

Sensory bins are amazing tools to bring all of your curriculum into one simple place. You can add math, science, history, and even language assignments all inside one bin for your kids to learn more about one subject. These are especially nice for unit studies on specific subjects or ideas. Choose items for your sensory bins that fit into each subject if possible. You can use counting, sorting, specific historical items for a subject, and even special specimens for science to create a great sensory bin that encompasses all of your class work in one location. You can take a look at the simple sensory bin we used in our ocean-themed study before our field trip to the aquarium. It was a great way to tie all of those learning concepts together!

Helps kids to follow directions.

If your kids struggle with following directions, sensory bins are an amazing tool. By giving them specific things to look for, sort and separate, you can easily create a manner of following directions that they will enjoy. This is really important as they move into other subjects where following directions impacts how they come up with an end result or answer. I love giving my kids a list of items to sort out or directions on how to use the sensory bin for our classwork. This keeps them occupied, learning and working on that direction following problem they often have in the early years.

Using sensory bins throughout your homeschool classroom will be a great way to help get your kids the hands-on education they need. It gives them an easy outlet to use their hands while learning, and allows them the sensory opportunity that many children need to truly understand concepts.

Do you use sensory bins in your homeschool?

 
Homeschool Omnibus

Sara (142 Posts)

I'm a reader, writer, dreamer, wife, and homeschooling mom of 3 girls. We take a relaxed, eclectic, Charlotte Mason-leaning, Montessori-ish, literature-rich, delight-directed, almost unschooling-at-times approach to learning. Lots of unit studies, field trips, and lapbooks, too. I like to blog about our learning adventures (plus faith and encouragement) at Embracing Destiny.


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10 Ways to Simplify Your Homeschooling

 

Homeschooling is a wonderful opportunity to teach your children what they really need to learn, and in a way that is custom-tailored to their personalities and learning styles. However, it’s very easy to become overwhelmed and to try to take on too much at once, which can rob you of your joy. If you feel that your homeschooling experience is becoming too busy and stressful, then you should check out these 10 Ways to Simplify Your Homeschooling!

10 Ways to Simplify Your Homeschooling so you can enjoy it more and worry less! hsbapost.com

10 Ways to Simplify Your Homeschooling

 

1. Reduce Materials

If you want to simplify your homeschooling, then one of the best ways is to reduce how many materials you use. Perhaps you can choose one resource or curriculum as a spine for your learning, along with a few educational websites and books from the library. If your bookshelves look like mine, maybe some decluttering is in order. Try digital homeschool resources to cut down on the need for storage space.

2. Make Lesson Plans Early

There’s nothing more stressful than having to come up with a lesson plan tonight for what you’re going to teach tomorrow. You’ll have a better experience, and be able to plan better, if you make your lesson plans or general course of study outline ahead of time.

3. Use A Homeschooling Binder

Use a homeschooling binder to organize your finished lesson plans, possible lesson ideas, things you want to remember, things you want to look into further, etc.

4. Have a Dedicated Homeschooling Space

A great way to simplify your homeschooling is to have a dedicated homeschooling space if you can. Use it to house the majority of your homeschooling supplies, and to give your kids a regular place to work.

5. Have a Consistent Daily Schedule

Having a daily schedule can be very helpful in simplifying your homeschooling! It helps your kids gauge how their day is going to go, and also allows you to better plan your day around your homeschooling time. The schedule doesn’t have to be a strict, by the hour type of schedule either. You can just break it down into flexible “before lunch” and “after lunch” time periods. Or find the routine that works for you on a consistent basis.

6. Unschool

Rather than following strict lesson plans, have you considered unschooling? Unschooling is perhaps one of the most flexible and simplified types of homeschooling. It allows your children to follow their own interests and curiosities and learn from them, rather than following a direct lesson plan. It’s a wonderful way to develop a love for learning in your child! We use delight-directed learning in our homeschool.

7. Reduce How Many Subjects are Covered Daily

You’ll easily stress yourself out if you’re trying to engage your child in a dozen different subjects within one day. Instead, have a few core topics you cover daily, and then include other topics every once in a while.

8. Let Your Children Work Alone

If they’re old enough, leave your children alone to work on their lessons. If they need help with something, they’ll know where to find you. This will help them learn to be independent workers, and will give you the time to work on some of your own things.

9. Give Your Children a Notebook

Rather than you being the only one who knows the lesson plan for the day, why not share it with your children as well? Give them a notebook, and every day write down their lessons. Your kids will likely enjoy being able to see their school day at a glance, and it’ll keep them from having to keep asking you what they should work on next.

10. Be Forgiving Of Yourself

Not every day will go as planned. That’s fine. One of the many benefits of homeschooling is that you can take the time to adjust, or to make up for lost time. In the end, your kids will learn everything they need to, so don’t fret the small stuff and forgive yourself the less than perfect days.

How do you simplify your homeschooling?

 

 

The digital homeschool Omnibus has all the great resources you need to simplify, organize, plan, and find the joy in your homeschooling:

Homeschool Omnibus

Sara (142 Posts)

I'm a reader, writer, dreamer, wife, and homeschooling mom of 3 girls. We take a relaxed, eclectic, Charlotte Mason-leaning, Montessori-ish, literature-rich, delight-directed, almost unschooling-at-times approach to learning. Lots of unit studies, field trips, and lapbooks, too. I like to blog about our learning adventures (plus faith and encouragement) at Embracing Destiny.


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