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Quick & Easy Trim Healthy Mama Recipes {that kids like too}

 

Guest post by Linda Rose.

I began my THM (Trim Healthy Mama) journey this past summer. In June I started training for a 5K using the Couch to 5K training program. Shortly after that, a friend started up a Trim Healthy Mama group at her house. At first I was like, ok sure I’ll come, but you can’t make me eat anything green or weird. After hearing people talk about THM, I still wasn’t convinced, but ordered the book out of curiosity anyway. I read the book and it just made sense. I had a light bulb moment! You see I had always thought that in order to lose weight I would have to eat weird or green food, but it turns out that isn’t the case at all.

It’s been slow going, and there are days that I find it challenging to eat on plan all the time, but even so, I’ve lost almost 27 pounds! I feel healthier, have more energy, and am still running. It almost feels strange to be able to eat some of the foods that I do eat and be able to still lose weight. And I don’t have to eat any weird or green foods (unless I’m feeling adventurous). I’m a pretty picky eater (so are some of my kids). In order to make THM work for me, I’ve had to make foods that the whole family will eat and love. I’m not about to make a meal for them and then make a separate one for me.

 

Many of the recipes in the THM eating plan are extremely quick and easy. If you are like me, you can appreciate that because honestly who has the time or the energy to slave away in the kitchen?

A couple favorite recipes at my house:

 

Chicken Alfredo (S meal for THM)

Ingredients:
6-8 frozen chicken breast tenders (or 3-4 whole chicken breasts)
1 pint heavy whipping cream
2 cups mozzarella cheese
garlic powder (or fresh if you have it)
salt and pepper to taste

Serve over Dreamfields spaghetti pasta or steamed broccoli.
Place the frozen chicken breast tenders into the bottom of the crockpot. Pour the heavy cream over the chicken. Sprinkle the garlic powder over the cream and chicken. Salt and pepper to taste. Add the mozzarella cheese. Turn the crockpot on high. I like to stir the ingredients every hour or so. It just prevents the cream and cheese from burning on the edges. As the chicken cooks it becomes tender and breaks apart easily. I use a fork to pull the chicken apart before serving. I serve the alfredo sauce over Dreamfields spaghetti with broccoli on the side. It’s so easy and delicious. I put the ingredients in the crockpot at lunchtime and it is ready by dinner time. If it’s ready sooner, then I just turn the crockpot down to warm until we are ready to eat it. The house smells delicous while this is cooking! (adapted from a recipe in the THM book, which you can purchase here)

Ham and Cheese Scrambled Eggs (S meal for THM)

Ingredients:
6 eggs
4-6 thick slices of ham–diced
1-2 tablespoons of cream cheese
1/4-1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese
Salt and pepper to taste
 
Directions:
Put all of the ingredients into a mixing bowl. Add salt and pepper to taste. Whisk everything together. Melt a couple tablespoons of butter into your frying pan. Add the ham and cheese egg mixture, stirring to help everything cook evenly.
 
You can use more or fewer eggs; this is what I use for our family. Alternately you could substitute the ham for some other breakfast meat–bacon or sausage is yummy too. Be careful if you choose to substitute store bought pre-packaged bacon bits as many of these have sugar in them.

 

These are quick, easy, and yummy–perfect for a quick breakfast!

 

Linda RoseLinda Rose blogs at Rose Academy and Sew Happily Ever After. She has 15+ years of teaching experience in public, private, after-school, and home school settings. She enjoys homeschooling her own children as well as teaching small group English classes in her home and at local co-ops. Sewing has become an important creative outlet for her and allows her to use her talents to bless her own family as well as others.

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Draw Your Way Through The Bible with The Picture Smart Bible

Would you like to learn the major themes, events, and characters of each book of the Bible? What if you could do it right alongside your children by reading, listening, drawing, and coloring? You get all that and more in The Picture Smart Bible!

With the Picture Smart Bible curriculum, you can draw your way through the Bible one book at a time, which helps make the Picture Smart Bible fun and memorable. Plus, when you finish this program, you will have your very own illustrated Bible!
Draw your way through the Bible
Not sure if this is the Bible curriculum for you? Then try before you buy! Picture This! Ministries offers a free sample lesson on their website , plus they’re giving away 1 Picture Smart Bible CD to a Homeschool Blog Award Winner!

This CD includes their complete curriculum of over 600 pages! In addition to all the needed teacher and student materials, the Picture Smart Bible CD also includes simple drawings to trace, helpful instructions to follow, and additional resources! This is a stand-alone curriculum that can also be used as a supplement for other Bible curricula.

picturesmartbiblecdThank you, Picture This! Ministries!

You can connect with Picture This! Ministries on their website or on Facebook.

Davonne (16 Posts)

Davonne Parks is a married Christian homeschool mom who began teaching her children at home in 2009. She blogs about cultivating a heart for motherhood, as well as organization and simplicity, at DavonneParks.com. Davonne believes that some of life’s richest moments happen when we embrace the beauty of imperfection as we extend grace to ourselves and others. She’s written two eBooks, “101 Time-Saving Tips for Busy Moms” (free to her blog subscribers) and “28 Days to Timeliness: Tips and Confessions from a Semi-Reformed Late Person.”


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Putting History into Perspective

Connecting History to the Modern World

 

Putting History into Perspective

Let’s face it, sometimes history can seem so dry.  Without context children lose the importance of understanding how history affects their own lives. Trying to connect their minds and hearts to something that happened long before they were even born can seem like a daunting task. Actually, it may seem impossible. The reality is it’s hard for any human to connect to something that happened decades, if not centuries, ago. It will seem irrelevant if there isn’t an understanding of how it connects with ones self.

I think there are three great ways to connect the old with the new. These three ideas allow a student to explore and consider history as it relates to other people, and ultimately to themselves. None of them are a great mystery and one or more of them are often incorporated into homeschooling. You may currently be using one of these methods but perhaps didn’t consider how you are connecting the old with the new.

History through Literature

History through Literature

Reading stories that are set in the same era, especially true, biographical and/or autobiographical stories, can put into perspective the time and place where events occurred. By putting a human face on the story we see how the events affected that person. We can read about their struggles, their worries, their victories and joys. We can see how government decisions affected the people living at the time. We can read about how a family endured during hardship or how they fought for the sake of freedom.

Whatever the story is about, reading through it with a child, while at the same time studying the historical events of the same era can help our children to relate to history. Comparing that history, that story, to how a child currently lives, and considering what might be different if events had turned out differently in the past, can help to truly put into perspective how history has shaped our world.

Resources for Historical Literary Guides

 

Personal History through Family Genealogy

 

Personal History through Family Genealogy

Knowing where they come from can help a child to connect with history. Discovering that a grandparent lived and served in the army during a war, or a great grandparent lived through the depression, or perhaps a 3 or 4x grandparent immigrated to the U.S. or even that you are related to royalty, can make for exciting discoveries, comprehension of how a period of time affects your actual family and make history seem more real.

A few years ago I became fascinated by ancestry research. It was before the show “Who Do You Think You Are?” began. But, the addition of that show has increased an awareness of personal family history. I’ve researched many direct lines of my family’s ancestry and have been fascinated by what I have found on both sides of my lineage.

Examples of my Personal History

  • My grandfather (my dad’s dad) was a soldier in World War 1. (Yes the first war, not the second).
  • I learned that my 9x Great Grandfather on my mother’s maternal side was one of the earliest settlers of the Maryland Colony and gave 100 acres for the establishment of London Towne, Anne Arundel County, Maryland.
  • On my father’s maternal side I can trace, not one line but 4 separate lines through English royalty including barons, earls, and knights. I also discovered that my 15x great-grandfather worked prominently with Kings Edward IV, Richard III, was the step father to King Henry VII and presided in his coronation ceremony.
  • I also discovered that through my 15X great-grandmother’s line I can directly trace my lineage back to King Edward III and subsequently William the Conquerer.
  • The infamous Devil Anse Hatfield and I share a common grandfather. His great-grandfather (Abner Vance) on his mother’s side (Nancy) is my 5x great-grandfather through her uncle James Howard. Which means we are 2nd cousins 4x removed.

There are more stories than just these. The point is that as we study through history being able to relate events to our ancestors helps to put into perspective how the history is personal to us. Knowing my grandfather was a soldier in the first world war helped me to truly relate to the events which unfolded. As my son is learning about the founding of the American colonies, I can point out that his 10X great-grandfather was there, was a part of the events, the culture and how the geography unfolded to form Maryland today.

Have you researched your ancestry? Do your children know where they come from? Have you made history relevant by learning about how your family interacted with the times?

Resources for Learning more about Personal Ancestral History

My favorite source is Google.com, it’s there that I can enter any name and the word genealogy, or include an approximate date and find a wealth of information. It doesn’t work every time, and many times it leads me back to ancestry.com which is where I keep my tree research, but sometimes, I unexpectedly find even more information to the stories than I had ever discovered and it opens my eyes to how each person’s life relates to the history that we read during the era in which they lived.

History Timeline

Using a History Timeline to Put History into Perspective

Building a historical timeline with your kids can help you to put the time frame into perspective. Knowing when something took place in relationship to the child’s own life, helps them to get a feel for how long ago something happened. Did it happen in their lifetime, just before they were born, in mom & dad’s lifetime, or grandma’s lifetime? Was the event something that took place before, during or after the life of Jesus Christ, was it something that happened during the time of Moses or David?

By connecting the dates of world history with something relevant to a child’s life will help them to put into perspective when something happened. It doesn’t have to be complicated. In fact, it can be quite simple.

Timelines do not have to be fancy. In our homeschool we use a simple binder and paper, we trace the timeline from creation forward. As we learn an era, we can easily see how close to creation or modern era the event happened. You can use a pre-made timeline, or make one of your own. A poster board, or homemade scroll would work nicely.

I recently discovered the game Time Line, where the goal is to put into chronological order the cards which contain specific events. It really is a fun game that can easily put events into historical context.

Have you used any of these methods of putting history into perspective for your children? Share with us in the comments.

 

Renée (21 Posts)

Renée Brown is author at her personal blog, Great Peace Academy. She is a homeschooling mom to her one amazing son, Jonathan and has been the wife of her Beloved Michael for 21 years. On her blog you will find discussions about her work as a homeschooling mom, her family and her faith.


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