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What NOT to Forget…When Moving Your Home{school}

 

What NOT to Forget...When Moving Your Home{school} @hsbapost

We have exactly 12 more nights in our home of nine years before we make our next to last move for a while.  Then approximately nine months later we will make a move to what we think will be a mostly permanent home for us.  And by the grace of God, this is the most organized that I have been during a move.  EVER.

One thought is that I’ve had a little bit more notice on this move than I have in the past.  Perhaps it is also because I’m a little older, and know that moving our homeschool in addition to our regular life is a pretty big deal, and cannot be done haphazardly, or we will suffer for it later.

It could also be due to the fact that I am not working outside the home during this one.  I am blessed that my packing is not relegated to only weekends and evening, or vacation days that would be MUCH better spent getting acclimated to the new place.

Or maybe my OCD tendencies are just becoming a bit more refined these days, and this is my moment  to shine!

Either way, I’ll take it, and share with you all that I have learned during the preparation for this move. When we talked about homeschooling a move last month, I focused specifically on how to keep the learning going!  Today, I would like to focus a little more on the logistics of the move itself.  I hope it blesses you the next time you need it!

 

1.  Begin with your list of utilities and services to be disconnected and connected.

It is easy to overlook something when compiling this list.  Trust me.  I started on this last Monday, and our water service still has yet to make it on to the list.

The two places I looked to make sure I hit everything were the files I keep for paid bills and my online banking account.  Somehow water made it past this security checkpoint, so I wonder what else I might have missed if I had only used one method?

Another word to the wise on this one…get as much as you can in writing (email is just fine) from your provider confirming the actual disconnect date.  I have already had TWO services disconnected early because a customer service provider put in the wrong date or simply no date at all, making it seem as though I was ready to get it done now.  Luckily I had backup confirming my actual request.  If not,  I could have been hit with a lot of fees to continue service until the date I actually requested it to be terminated.

The services being connected are just as important.  Nothing would be less fun in a move than to arrive at your new residence with no power or running water.  To make sure you don’t miss anything, just match up services you are looking for to the services you had.  If your current one provides service in your new location, that makes it even easier! None of mine for this particular move are the same, but going down that list has helped make sure I will have everything we need when we get there.

And don’t forget to make the address change with the post office, which can now be conveniently done online!!!

 

2.   Make this as easy as possible on the moving team.

Most moving companies these days provide you a “by the hour” quote as opposed to a flat rate.  This means that the more organized you are = less time it will take them to get you moved = less out of pocket expense for you.

Do your best to label boxes clearly in terms of not only their contents, but their room destination in the new home.  I found these nifty little labels at The Container Store last week, and have purchased two sets of them.  My only complaint so far is that there are MANY more boxes than labels, because of the way the labels are evenly distributed throughout the rooms.  To remedy this situation, I’m going to use as many labels as I can, to get the movers used to the colors that go with each room, and then purchase plain stickers that match these colors and complete my boxes with those.

I also plan to print out a floor plan of our rental (f you don’t have access to this, you could try your hand at sketching it out) and label each room with it’s appropriate name (i.e. Bedroom #2 is Zoe’s Room…Bedroom #3 is the Study).  Then prior to the move I will hang a sign on each door with the name and corresponding sticker color.

And do your best to have as few loose items as possible.  We always move our computers, printers and monitors on our own, to prevent possible damage AND because packing  that stuff is just not any fun!

 

3.   If making a pit stop on the way to a permanent home, decide what you can live without during that time.

I have done a lot of culling in the last few weeks, knowing that we will have to keep many things in boxes during our stay in the rental.  These boxes are still labeled with their contents and the room they were packed FROM, but have a different destination once we get there.

First round was getting rid of things that we knew we were not going to use any longer.  This may sound simple, but many people become so rushed in their packing, that they make the decision to deal with it when they get to the next place.  Most of the time, it ends up adding to the cost of the move and never gets dealt with.  So I am trying to be as thorough as possible in this task,

Second round was dividing everything in to “must have for now” and “could live without for a while but do not want to get rid of” categories, and making sure my boxes are labeled as such.  It will be a blessing to cut down on the unpacking especially since I’m going to have to do it all over again in nine months or so.

 

4.   Avoid the high cost of special packing that can skyrocket your moving bill.

As an example….when the first movers came out to give us a quote, they offered the service of boxing up all of our pictures.  I thought that sounded like a pretty good idea myself.  Much easier than what I  was planning to do.

I shared this information with my husband, and he informed me that not only would it add to the time of the move, but that their picture boxes would be marked up triple the cost that they would be at a box store or local hardware store. So our decision would be to either transport them ourselves before the actual move, or have them already boxed up when the movers arrive.

Either way, we are keeping our costs down with this option.

 

5.   Preparation for your arrival will help cut down the stress.

If you elect to go with the “transport them yourself” option of any of the special packing items OR just anything in general, you could also  take this opportunity to make a trip to the grocery store for anything your family needs once they get there.  Stock the bathrooms with toilet paper, put paper towels in the kitchen….any pantry items you were running out of before you packed….and if the refrigerator is already there and hooked up, get those cold items in there and ready for your first meal.  This eliminates the need to make a fast food run, which we all know is the least healthy option.  You will be exhausted, and your body will need fuel, so let’s get the right stuff in it to rejuvenate you!

 

So there you have it!  My list of what NOT to forget when moving your home{school}!  I’ll be back next month to talk about settling in to a new location.  And I’ll be sure to let you know how this move goes!

Because here is a little secret…this may or may not be the first time I have EVER done these things when preparing for a move.

If you had to guess, which one would you pick?

 

Ellen Pool (4 Posts)

Ellen is a homeschool mom of one who blogs about homeschooling, faith, family and fitness at Grace Tells Another Story. She homeschool an "only", and they have a blast together!! Every day is "girls day"! She and her family live outside of Houston, Texas.


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Toddler and Baby Friendly Homeschool Room

This is my second year homeschooling.  My two older boys are in 1st grade and Kindergarten.  Easy peasy.  However, the 2 1/2 year old and crawling 8 month old are a force to be reckoned with.  The spring was a challenge with a newborn and a toddler, but now that the baby MOVES, I have to be as efficient as possible.  This means a tidy, organized, inviting, and baby proofed school room.

Here’s what I came up with.  Tips are in the captions below.  This morning was our first official day and it went pretty smoothly!

Toddler and Baby Friendly Homeschool Room

post1

Keep DVDs, TV, and DVD player up high. Those dangling cords proved to be a problem for me today. I need to find a taller trashcan to distract my 8 month old. He pulled the plug RIGHT in the middle of our Math U See lesson.

the post 4

We use Sonlight and last year I kept my notebooks on a desk and so many pages got ripped out by my then 18 month old. Keep mommy friendly things out of sight to prevent disorganization.

Keep books up high to prevent little ones from ripping pages.  A couch or comfy chair is a MUST if you're nursing a little one!

Keep books up high to prevent little ones from ripping pages. A couch or comfy chair is a MUST if you’re nursing a little one!

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Even though you’d like to keep the littles out so that you can concentrate…DON’T! Include them. Hands-on, non choking manipulatives are great (mine throw them and sometimes it gets nuts, but we’re working on that ;))

Post a clear, easy to understand schedule so that ALL your kiddos, young or old know what's coming.  (And so mommy doesn't forget!  I forgot handwriting for like a month last year!)

Post a clear, easy to understand schedule so that ALL your kiddos, young or old know what’s coming. (And so mommy doesn’t forget! I forgot handwriting for almost a month last year!)

Framed chicken wire hung up high is the perfect place to hang art work with clothespins.  Hanging things too low down will allow your little ones to rip them off the wall....and then eat them.  Hey, it's a rough homeschooling world out there!

Framed chicken wire hung up high is the perfect place to hang art work with clothespins. Hanging things too low down will allow your little ones to rip them off the wall….and then eat them. Hey, it’s a rough homeschooling world out there!

Keep markers, pencils, and big boy crayons up high.  I buy jumbo crayons for my little ones to use and keep them in a place they can access them.

Keep markers, pencils, and big boy crayons up high. I buy jumbo crayons for my little ones to use and keep them in a place they can access them.

If you’re a homeschool blogger and you have a post sharing your school room for this year, please join in and link up.

Click the graphic through to visit iHomeschool Network’s Not Back to School Blog Hop: School Room Week!

Not Back to School Blog Hop 2013

Liz (5 Posts)

Liz was a cheerleader swept off her feet by the football player back in high school. They’ve been married nearly ten years and are the proud parents to four young boys. She’d always envisioned working and sending her kiddos off to school so she could live the ‘normal’ American dream. However, life and the Lord surprised her and she’s learning to ‘redefine having it all’ while being a debt free homeschooling housewife. She enjoys finding strength from God’s word, the Today show, talking on the phone with friends, and being real about finances and parenting.


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Organizing Your Homeschool Books

How to set up your library so that your reading flourishes:

I got the idea of how to organize my home library from the book Little Guide To Your Well-Read LifeHe first suggests dividing books into unread (Library of Candidates) and read (Living Library).

All our books are spread out throughout the house on shelves in different rooms. My unread books remain in my bedroom while most read and reference books are in my office, with a few exceptions.

  • Dining/Family Room: Homeschool books we are actively using, reference books, and baskets of readers (labeled Bible history, science, reading. See photo below)
  • My Bedroom: Books I plan to read or will read again (Library of Candidates). Shelves are labeled:  Hebrew Roots,  Christian Encouragement, Devotionals, Relation vs Religion, Christian Fiction, Theology, Reference, Health.
  • Living Room: Theology, hubby’s political books, horses (best hardbacks look nice in the living room).
  • My Office Shelves (photo right):  Theology, Bible study tools, reference (for whatever book I am working on), and two huge shelves of books read waiting to give away or list on PaperbackSwap (currently on vacation hold because I am too busy to mail books).
  • Upstairs Shelves: Homeschool books we are not actively studying (I rotate to dining/family room area as needed). Also includes tons of boxed books that need shelves.
  • Kitchen: Cookbooks
  • Boys’ Rooms: Book baskets we rotate to dining/family room area as needed.

Steve’s Suggestions

  1. Create a two-part library. Devote one portion to books you plan to read—what Steve calls your Library of Candidates. Reserve the other for the books you have read—your Living Library. In Steve’s home library, Candidates are on shelves that line one wall of his study. The books in his Living Library are on the facing wall and elsewhere in his home.
  2. Cluster titles of comparable interest. Keep all candidate books on bird watching together, for example. Even here, though, listen to your inner reading voice, with all its quirks. Do you keep all your novels on Venice in a fiction section, or should they live in a travel section? Perhaps you have enough books on Venice to claim their own section. Each method works.
  3. Label your shelves. This time-honored tradition works as well in a home library as it does in public libraries. The label holders that we recreated from a 19th-century library catalog are easily adaptable for any library because they’re so simple to customize.

Ah, but what should those labels say?

They could all be traditional or totally idiosyncratic. Here are some traditional labels: Here are some rather idiosyncratic labels:
  • Biography
  • Business
  • Classics
  • Fiction
  • Gardening
  • History
  • Bling Bling
  • First Novels
  • Grandma Moses
  • Grapes of Roth
  • Haiku
  • Out of Africa

In his home library, Steve intersperses traditional labels with other titles of his own, including:

  • Après Reading: A temporary holding shelf in his Living Library where Steve keeps a new book that he’s just finished reading. He revisits the book two or three times over the course of a few weeks, immediately after reading it, to help him retain more of what he’s read. Then he shelves it in his Living Library.
  • For When I Go There: Candidate books that Steve has ready to leap off the shelf and go in his carry-on…for when he goes there. More than a dozen books set in the Florida Keys await long weekends. For longer treks, he has Robert Hughes’s Fatal Shore: The Epic of Australia’s Founding, Tony Horwitz’s Blue Latitudes, about the South Pacific of Captain Cook’s day, and Paul Theroux’s Pillars of Hercules: A Grand Tour of the Mediterranean.
  • Books to Give: Books he stocks up to give away. They range from several for young people who are starting their careers to those for friends who have lost a family member.
  • Maybe Later: Books he’s given up on for now, but may come back to someday. As he reminds readers in his Little Guide, it’s okay to give up on a book—even one that’s supposed to be good.

4. Keep empty space on your bookshelves so that your library can continue to grow as your interests do. Empty shelves are like a beckoning road ahead.

What?? An empty shelf…time to get more books! :-)

5. Optional: Add a large floor pillow…for your dog. Makes a great footrest for when you choose a book from your (labeled) shelf, sit down in your favored chair, and read. Ahhhh. To quote Shakespeare (shelved under Classics): “My library was dukedom enough.”

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